Project 1

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The Brush/Lens Project is in the news....

 

 

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The Brush/Lens Project expands its visibility and Long Island Pulse Magazine covers this exhibit.

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What people are saying...

I think you really got people thinking about the relationship between photography and painting, and also about the way a photographer sees and a painter sees.

Harold Naideau, Photographer, Author, Educator
 

I believe that both Holly and Ward share this capacity to feel color. If one thinks of color metaphorically as having, say, a musical quality, then part of what you “hear” in this show are their harmonies, the color duets, their riffs, for which their motifs are sometimes scaffolds---structurally sound, quickly achieved, but armatures nonetheless for the music of color.

Peter Pitzele, Art/Write

 

The pairings give viewers the unique opportunity to see side-by-side their creative interpretations of the subject and a collaboration that will leave one overwhelmed by the art created over the lifetime of a painter and new roads a photographer took to expand the use of technology to identify a new area of photography. This is an exhibit that could become a contemporary piece of the history of art and artists who inspired by Long Island influenced the evolution of art.

Bridget Shirvell, LI Pulse.com

 

There’s no telling where their artistic visions will lead them….and there’s no end to the journey.

Talia Amorosano, Times Beacon Record

 

As the two explored, starting in Northport and making their way to the Kings Park Bluffs and sites in Huntington, they came across the Dove-Torr Cottage in Huntington and realized that their journey had been traveled before. Arthur Dove and Helen Torr were early American artists from the late 1800’s and early to mid 1900’s. The two met later in life, discovered their connection and began working together, one inspiring the other, as Mr. Hooper and Ms. Gordon have done.

Jennifer Eyering, Then Observer